Charlene Nielsen: The Geography of Born Too Small.

The goal of my research is to better understand the relationships of the shared exposures on pregnant women and adverse birth outcomes. Infants born small for gestational age (SGA) and low birth weight at term (LBWT) are important markers of survival, development, and future health – childhood as well as adult diseases. I use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and spatial statistics to recognize where and how environmental factors coincide with SGA and LBWT. In this presentation I show the many ways of mapping babies born too small from secondary health databases using: choropleth, Bayes rates, double kernel density, and emerging hot spots.

Charlene Nielsen is an interdisciplinary PhD candidate in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences & Pediatrics at the University of Alberta, and works on the Data Mining and Neonatal Outcomes (DoMiNO) project.

Sophie Norris: Glacial Landforms of Northwest Saskatchewan.
The Interior Plains of northern Alberta and Saskatchewan hosted the Laurentide-Cordilleran ice saddle and the south-western slopes of the Keewatin Ice Dome at the peak of the Late Wisconsinan glaciation. Subsequently, the western margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet passed over this region during the deglaciation, opening the north-western drainage route for Lake Agassiz. The north-western Agassiz outlet and the associated flooding event(s) have received great attention and continue to be a subject of debate.  However, the detailed ice dynamics in the region, the understanding of which is crucial for inferences of meltwater drainage, is still poorly understood. This applies both for the ice sheet geometry at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and for the pattern of ice margin retreat.

We focus on a 260,680 km2 region of northeast Alberta and northwest Saskatchewan centered on the Clearwater-Athabasca Spillway, the assumed north-western Agassiz outlet.  Using mapping from high-resolution digital elevation data, we reconstruct the glacial landform record comprising attenuated bedforms, eskers, moraines and meltwater channels.  These data permit the classification of 62 flowsets that indicate multiple cross cutting ice flow directions. We tie the reconstructed ice flow direction with moraines and meltwater landforms to derive the ice margin configuration.  Based on this mapping we present a preliminary five-stage model of ice sheet evolution in the form of palaeo-geographic maps spanning from the LGM through to deglaciation (~21-9.5 cal ka BP).  This reconstruction reveals three major changes in ice stream configuration and indicates that margin retreat was complex and dominated by the dynamic spatial and temporal evolution of ice streams. Overall, this project provides the foundations to improve the knowledge of one of the focal points of the last North American deglaciation.km3 region of northeast Alberta and northwest Saskatchewan centered on the Clearwater-Athabasca Spillway, the assumed north-western Agassiz outlet.  Using mapping from high-resolution digital elevation data, we reconstruct the glacial landform record comprising attenuated bedforms, eskers, moraines and meltwater channels.  These data permit the classification of 62 flowsets that indicate multiple cross cutting ice flow directions. We tie the reconstructed ice flow direction with moraines and meltwater landforms to derive the ice margin configuration.  Based on this mapping we present a preliminary five-stage model of ice sheet evolution in the form of palaeo-geographic maps spanning from the LGM through to deglaciation (~21-9.5 cal ka BP).  This reconstruction reveals three major changes in ice stream configuration and indicates that margin retreat was complex and dominated by the dynamic spatial and temporal evolution of ice streams. Overall, this project provides the foundations to improve the knowledge of one of the focal points of the last North American deglaciation.